What is the difference between project management and product management?

As with the functions of product marketing and product management which, as we saw in the previous chapter, are quite distinct but overlapping, project management and product management functions are also quite distinct, but they also have a lot in common.

Before talking about the difference between these functions, we need to make clear the difference between project and product. I will turn to Wikipedia once again:

Project
A project in business and science is usually defined as a collaborative venture, often involving research or design, that is carefully designed to achieve a particular goal.
Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project)

Product
The term product is defined as “something produced by work or effort” or as “the result of an act or process” and has its origin in the Latin verb produce (re), ‘make exist’.
Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_(business))

That is, while the project is a process with a beginning, middle, and end; product is the result of a process.

See the table below for the main differences between project and product:

ProjectProduct
Clearly defined beginning, middle, and end.The beginning and middle are identifiable, but the end is not.
Focus on delivery with a well-defined path.Focus on results with a well-defined objective.
Closed scope defined during planning.Testing and validation of ideas lead the way.
May work in predictable scenarios.Suitable for volatile scenarios and contexts.

To help make these differences tangible, here are some examples:

  • Locaweb: before having its own data center, Locaweb placed its servers in Embratel’s data center. In 2006, Locaweb decided to invest in its own data center, which was clearly a project. In fact, two projects, the project to build their own data center and the project to migrate the servers that were at Embratel to their own data center. Locaweb’s products (Site Hosting, Email Marketing, Virtual Store, etc.) are clearly products.
  • Building: The construction of a building, from its conception to the delivery of the keys, is a project with well-defined phases. On the other hand, after the keys are handed over to the buyers, we can look at a building as a product. People will live in the building, some apartments will be rented, others will be sold, there will be renovations, condominium management, and so on.
  • Marriage: the decision to get married and the entire wedding process is clearly a project, with the wedding ceremony, party, and honeymoon. After the honeymoon is over, and married life begins, we must look at marriage as a product, married life, children and grandchildren, the family, and family life.

So, managing projects and products are two distinct functions?

Yes. While one manages a project, her concern is with the process and everything that surrounds it, ie if it is on time, has everything that is needed and is being done with the expected quality.

On the other hand, when building a product, the main concern is to ensure that it solves a problem of the customer to whom it is intended, and meets the company’s objectives.

In a 2007 blog post How To Be A Good Product Manager, author Jeff Lash recalls some important points to keep in mind when thinking about project management and product management:

  1. Just as every product needs a product manager, every project needs a project manager.
  2. The fact that product managers believe they are capable of managing their own projects does not mean that they should manage their own projects.
  3. The skills, talents, and knowledge involved in project management are very different from those involved in product management.
  4. Just as it is difficult to find a person capable of doing product management and product marketing at the same time very well, it is difficult to find a person capable of doing product management and project management at the same time.
  5. Project management is not a step in the product management career, nor is product management a step in the project management career.
  6. Good project managers are as valuable as good product managers.
  7. Having a good project manager to manage your projects will help you be a better product manager.
  8. The less time a product manager spends managing projects, the more time she spends managing the product.
  9. To avoid conflicts between project management and product management, project managers, product managers, and the entire team involved in the project should agree on the goals shared by the team as much as possible.

Marty Cagan makes clear the need to separate these roles in one of his posts:

“For internet companies, it’s really important that the roles are separated. You’ll have trouble managing your releases if you don’t separate those roles, and your releases will always be late and longer than they should be.” — Marty Cagan

And how do agile methodologies view these functions?

Agile methodologies, specifically Scrum, have two clear roles in the team: one more focused on the project, the Scrum Master; and another one more product-focused, the product owner (PO):

  • Product Owner: a person responsible for maintaining the product backlog, which represents the interests of stakeholders.
  • Scrum Master: a person responsible for the Scrum process, ensuring that it is used correctly and maximizing its benefits.
  • Team: Multifunctional group of people responsible for managing themselves to develop the product.
  • Scrum Team: Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Team.

There is an article on InfoQ written by Mark Levison in 2008 called Can Product Owner and Scrum Master be Combined? – where the theme of having a single person managing project and product is discussed. Both in the opinions that make up the text – and include testimonials from people like Mike Cohn and Ken Schwaber – as in the comments made by readers of the article, it is unanimous that, although it is possible to combine the two roles – and if the team is very small, it is even acceptable – the most recommended is that they are performed by different people.

And in real life?

All the reports seen are based on actual facts, but we know that each company has its own reality and context. So, what is better to do: leave these roles separate or combined?

Ideally, you should experiment and at some point, you will find a combination that suits you, the team you work with, and your business. Note that each group of people has its own dynamics, and what works in one group of people may not work for another.

At Locaweb, we have several teams developing different products, and each one has its own dynamics where the product manager assumes different responsibilities with respect to the team. In some, the responsibility for technical project management tasks – that is, taking care of product development, deployment and operation issues – is handled by a project manager, while at other times this responsibility is shared between the engineering leader and product manager.

On the other hand, in all teams, the product manager plays the role of project manager for all non-technical tasks. That is, she coordinates with the marketing team product communication, coordinates with legal and finance areas the product’s legal and tax requirements, supports marketing in training for sales teams and takes care of passing knowledge to the customer support team.

You must find a balance that makes sense to you, your team, and the company you work for. Be careful not to absorb all project management responsibilities. Try to share them with someone, especially the technical issues; otherwise, there will be no time left for you to manage your product.

Digital product education, coaching and advisory

I’ve been helping companies bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.

Qual a Diferença Entre Gestão de Projetos e Gestão de Produtos?

Assim como com as funções de gestão de marketing de produtos e gestão de produtos que, conforme vimos no capítulo anterior, são bastante distintas, mas apresentam sobreposição; as funções de gestão de projetos e de gestão de produtos também são bem distintas, mas também apresentam bastante coisa em comum.

Antes de falar sobre a diferença entre essas funções, é preciso deixar claro a diferença de projeto e produto. Vou recorrer mais uma vez à Wikipédia:

Projeto
Um projeto em negócio e ciência é normalmente definido como um empreendimento colaborativo, frequentemente envolvendo pesquisa ou desenho, que é cuidadosamente planejado para alcançar um objetivo particular.
Fonte: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project

Produto
O termo produto é definido como “algo produzido pelo trabalho ou esforço” ou como “resultado de um ato ou processo” e tem sua origem no verbo produzir, do Latim produce(re), ‘fazer existir’.
Fonte: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Product_(business)

Enquanto o projeto é um processo com começo, meio e fim; o produto é o resultado de um processo, de um esforço.

Veja na tabela abaixo as principais diferenças entre projeto e produto:

ProjetoProduto
Tem começo, meio e fim claramente definidos.Começo e meio são identificáveis, mas seu fim não.
Foco na entrega com um caminho bem delimitadoFoco no resultado com um objetivo bem definido
Escopo fechado definido no planejamentoTestes e validações de ideias guiam o caminho
Pode funcionar em cenários previsíveis Indicado para cenários e contextos voláteis

Para ajudar a tangibilizar essas diferenças, aqui vão alguns exemplos:

  • Locaweb: antes de ter um datacenter próprio, a Locaweb colocava seus servidores no datacenter da Embratel. Em um determinado momento, Em 2006 a Locaweb decidiu investir em seu próprio datacenter, o que claramente era um projeto. Na verdade, dois projetos, o projeto de construção do datacenter próprio e o projeto de migração dos servidores que estavam na Embratel para o datacenter próprio. Já os produtos da Locaweb (Hospedagem de Sites, Email Marketing, Loja Virtual, etc.) são claramente produtos.
  • Prédio: a construção de um prédio, desde sua concepção até a entrega das chaves é um projeto com fases bem difinidas. Por outro lado, depois que as chaves são entregues para os compradores, podemos olhar um prédio como um produto. Pessoas irão morar no prédio, alguns apartamentos serão alugados, outros serão vendidos, haverá reformas, gestão de condomínio, e assim por diante.
  • Casamento: a decisão de se casar e todo o processo de casamento é claramente um projeto, com a cerimônia de casamento, festa, lua-de-mel. Depois que acaba a lua de mel, e come’xa a vida de casado, devemos olhar o casamento como um produto, a vida de casado, os filhos e netos, a família, o dia-a-dia em família.

Então Gerir Projetos e Produtos são Duas Funções Distintas?

Sim. Enquanto se está gerindo um projeto, a preocupação é com o processo e com tudo o que o cerca, ou seja, se está no prazo, se tem tudo o que é necessário e se está sendo feito com a qualidade esperada.

Por outro lado, quando gerimos um produto, a maior preocupação é garantir que este resolva um problema do cliente a quem ele é destinado, e atenda aos objetivos da empresa.

Em um post de 2007 do blog How To Be A Good Product Manager – disponível em https://www.goodproductmanager.com/2007/09/24/product-management-vs-project-management/ –, o autor Jeff Lash lembra alguns pontos importantes que não devemos esquecer quando pensamos em gestão de projetos e gestão de produtos:

  1. Assim como todo produto precisa de um gestor de produtos, todo projeto precisa de um gestor de projetos.
  2. O fato de os gestores de produtos acreditarem que são capazes de gerir seus próprios projetos não significa que eles devam gerir seus próprios projetos.
  3. As competências, talentos e conhecimento envolvidos em gestão de projetos são bem diferentes dos envolvidos em gestão de produtos.
  4. Assimcomoédifícilencontrarumapessoacapazdefazer,ao mesmo tempo, gestão de produtos e marketing de produtos muito bem, é difícil encontrar uma pessoa capaz de fazer ao mesmo tempo gestão de produtos e gestão de projetos muito bem.
  5. Gestão de projetos não é um passo na carreira de gestão de produtos, nem gestão de produtos é um passo na carreira de gestão de projetos.
  6. Bons gestores de projetos são tão valiosos quanto bons gestores de produtos.
  7. Ter um bom gestor de projetos para gerenciar seus projetos vai lhe ajudar a ser um gestor de produtos melhor.
  8. Quanto menos tempo um gestor de produtos passar gerenciando projetos, mais tempo passará gerindo o produto.
  9. Para evitar conflitos entre gestão de projetos e gestão de produtos, os gestores de projetos, os gestores de produtos e todo o time envolvido no projeto devem acordar sobre os objetivos compartilhados pelo time o máximo possível.

Já Marty Cagan deixa clara a necessidade de separação desses papéis em um de seus posts – disponível em https://www.svpg.com/product-management-vs-project-management/:

“Para empresas de internet é realmente importante que os papéis sejam separados. Você vai ter problemas em gerenciar seus releases se você não separar esses papéis, e seus releases vão sempre atrasar e demorar mais do que deveriam.” – Marty Cagan

E Como as Metodologias Ágeis Veem Essas Funções?

As metodologias ágeis, mais especificamente o Scrum, têm dois papéis claros no time: um focado mais no projeto, o Scrum Master; e outro focado mais no produto, o Product Owner (PO):

  • Product Owner: pessoa responsável por manter o backlog do produto, que representa os interesses dos stakeholders. Scrum Master: pessoa responsável pelo processo Scrum, garantido que é usado corretamente e maximizando seus benefícios.
  • Team: grupo de pessoas multifuncional responsável por se gerenciar para desenvolver o produto.
  • Scrum Team: Product Owner, Scrum Master e o Time.

Há um artigo na InfoQ escrito por Mark Levison em 2008, chamado Can Product Owner and Scrum Master be Combined? (em uma tradução livre, “Product Owner e Scrum Master podem ser combinados?”) – disponível em http://www.infoq.com/br/news/2008/12/scrum-master-product-owner –, em que o tema de ter uma única pessoa gerindo projeto e produto é discutido. Tanto nas opiniões que compõem o texto – e que incluem testemunhos de pessoas como Mike Cohn e Ken Schwaber – quanto nos comentários feitos por leitores do artigo, é unânime que, apesar de ser possível combinar as duas funções – e, se o time for muito pequeno, é até aceitável –, o mais recomendado é que estas sejam desempenhadas por pessoas diferentes.

E na Vida Real?

Todos os relatos vistos são baseados em fatos reais, mas sabemos que cada empresa tem sua própria realidade e seu próprio contexto. Então, o que é melhor fazer: deixar esses papéis separados ou combinados?

O ideal é você ir experimentando e, em algum determinado ponto, você encontrará uma combinação que seja a mais adequada para você, para o time com quem você trabalha e para a sua empresa. Note que cada grupo de pessoas tem sua dinâmica própria, e o que funciona em um grupo de pessoas pode não funcionar para outro.

Na Locaweb, tínhamos vários times desenvolvendo diferentes produtos, e cada um tem sua dinâmica própria onde o gestor de produtos assume responsabilidades diferentes em relação ao time. Em alguns, a responsabilidade pelas tarefas de gestão de projeto técnico – cuidar de questões de desenvolvimento, deploy e operação do produto – é tocada por um gestor de projetos, enquanto que, em outros times, essa responsabilidade é compartilhada entre o líder técnico da equipe e o gestor de produtos.

Por outro lado, em todos os times, o gestor de produtos exerce o papel de gestor de projetos para todas as tarefas não técnicas. Isto é, coordena com o time de marketing a comunicação do produto, coordena com o jurídico e com o financeiro suas necessidades legais e fiscais, suporta marketing no treinamento para as equipes de vendas, e cuida de passar o conhecimento para a equipe de suporte técnico.

Enfim, procure encontrar um equilíbrio que faça sentido para você, para o seu time e para empresa que você trabalha, só tome cuidado para não absorver todas as funções de gestão de projetos. Procure dividi-las com alguém, principalmente as questões técnicas; caso contrário, não sobrará tempo para você gerir seu produto.

Educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão de produtos digitais

Tenho ajudado empresas a conectar negócios e tecnologia por meio de educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão e desenvolvimento de produtos digitais. Ajudo líderes de produto (CPOs, heads de produtos, CTOs, CEOs, tech founders, heads de transformação digital) a extrair mais valor e resultados de seus produtos digitais. Veja aqui como posso ajudar você e a sua empresa.

Newsletter

Escrevo reguIarmente sobre gestão de produtos, desenvolvimento de produtos, liderança de produtos digitais e transformação digital. Vc pode receber uma notificação por email sempre que eu publicar algo novo, sem depender dos algoritmos de notificação de redes sociais. Basta assinar minha newsletter.

Gestão de produtos digitais

Você trabalha com produtos digitais? Quer saber mais sobre como gerenciar um produto digital para aumentar suas chances de sucesso, resolver os problemas do usuário e atingir os objetivos da empresa? Confira meu pacote de gerenciamento de produto digital com meus 3 livros, onde compartilho o que aprendi durante meus mais de 30 anos de experiência na criação e gerenciamento de produtos digitais. Se preferir, pode comprar os livros individualmente:

Should we have a dedicated bug fixing team?

Similar to the question about the dedicated innovation team, this is another question I’ve been receiving a lot in my coaching sessions, so its answer may also be of interest to more people. In this case, the short answer is NO. This one has no space for an “it depends” kind of answer. Let us dive deeper.

Your code, your bugs

If you build something, you are the only one responsible for its quality. If what you built is not working as expected, you are responsible to fix it. It is that simple. It doesn’t make sense to have a different team to fix bugs made by different people. The people most capable to fix a bug is the people who created the bug. By the way, this is the best incentive for people to create less bugs.

What about legacy systems?

In a legacy system, the team inherits a code that they didn’t write. Normally, the people who wrote the code are not in the company anymore. In this case, does it make sense to have a team dedicated to fix its bugs? Ideally, NO. The legacy system should be the responsibility of one team, who will fiz bugs but also work on improving and evolving the legacy system. One very common strategy to deal with legacy system is strangling strategy, i.e., to slowly drain the life out of a legacy system by gradually replacing parts of it with a modern implementation.

Another important aspect of legacy system is that we don’t need to necessarily fix its bugs. Sometimes, fixing a bug in a legacy system can cost a lot, since no one has enough knowledge to debug the system. In some cases, instead of fixing the bug by fixing its root cause, we can apply some workaround fix that does the trick of making the legacy system deliver the expected result. In these cases, we can apply a strategy called “monitor and apply workround”, i.e., as soon as we figure out a workaround for a certain bug, probably developed outside of the legacy system, we then monitor the undesired behaviour and, as soon as the behaviour appears, we automatically apply the workaround. It’s the idea that, depending on the general health of the patient, some illnesses are better managed with medicine than with surgery.

Should we dedicate X% of the time to bug correction?

Again, the answer is a plain simple NO. I already explained how important it’s to deliver good quality products:

Any user prefers to use a good quality product that behaves as expected. This is a sine qua non condition to provide a good user experience.

In addition to the user experience, there is another important aspect to consider when we talk about quality and bugs. Whenever someone needs to work on resolving a bug that was found in a digital product, that person needs to stop working on whatever they are currently working on in order to resolve the bug. This is an interruption in the workflow. If that person were able to deliver the software without that bug, they could continue to work on new things without interruption, which would make them more productive.

In this same article there’s an interesting chart about the number of bugs fixed as a percentage of total deliveries at Conta Azul. It went from 45% to 65%, way more than the 20%. When we saw this, we worked on decreasing this percentage, by improving the quality of what we deployed.

% of bugs fixed at Conta Azul

In another team we tracked the percentage of new items deployed, and deliberately created OKRs to increase this percentage. In 2 years we were able to go from 50% of new items deployed to 90% of new items deployed:

% of new items deployed

In my experience, instead of fixing the % of effort dedicated to bug fixing, it’s more productive to focus on creating quality code, without bugs. In order to do that, we should track the percentage of work spent in fixing bugs and actively manage this number to decrease.

Summing up

  • Similar to the question about the dedicated innovation team, this is another question I’ve been receiving a lot in my coaching sessions, so its answer may also be of interest to more people. In this case, the short answer is NO. Your code, your bugs.
  • If you inherit a legacy system, you’ll have to manage a code you didn’t write. Managing means not only fixing its bugs but also work on improving and evolving the legacy system, which will probably include a strangling strategy to gradually move features from the legacy system to new architecture.
  • We should also not use fixed percentage of time allocated to fixing bugs. It’s more productive to focus on creating quality code, without bugs. In order to do that, we should track the percentage of work spent in fixing bugs and actively manage this number to decrease.

Digital product education, coaching and advisory

I’ve been helping companies bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.

Should we have a dedicated innovation team?

This is a question I’ve been receiving a lot in my coaching sessions, so its answer may be of interest to more people. The short answer is “no and yes” which, I know, doesn’t answer much. It is the famous and not-so-useful “it depends” reply used to answer many product management questions. So I’ll expand on the “no and yes” answer bringing some examples from my experience.

No, we should not have a dedicated innovation team

Sometimes we are tempted to create a dedicated innovation team because all our existing teams already have the day-to-day topics to take care of. They don’t have space in their agenda to innovate, so let’s create a separate team to focus on exploring innovations.

Well, that’s not the right mindset to have. All of our existing teams should not only have space to innovate, but their day-to-day work should be to explore innovations.

How? Please follow my reasoning. Product development teams are supposed to be problem-solver teams or, as Marty Cagan says, empowered product teams, i.e., they are given problems to solve and results to achieve and they do so by creating solutions to these problems. Given a problem to solve and a result to achieve, the team is free to experiment with different solution options, and that’s exactly how innovations are born.

If we force our product development teams to operate in a solution-implementer mode or, as Marty Cagan calls them, as feature teams, there’s no space to come up with innovations. They’ll be working on implementing solutions devised by other people, people that do not have enough experience and knowledge of what is possible to do with technology. So it’s very difficult to create innovations with teams operating in a solution-implementer mode.

So, to foster all your product development teams to innovate, they need to have an objective, a problem to solve, so they can test different solutions and maybe come up with new and unseen solution.

At Lopes, the biggest real estate company in Brazil, where I lead Lopes Labs, the technology and innovation team between 2020 and 2022, we used OKRs to define the objectives and key results we wanted to achieve, and tracked these objectives and key results weekly. The teams were free to define what to implement in order to achieve the key results.

We also had quarterly hackdays, 3 days in the beginning of the quarter when people from Lopes Labs formed new temporary teams to solve problems the teams proposed. Many interesting innovations were born during the hackdays. This is a technique I also used at Locaweb and at Gympass with very good results in terms of creating innovations.

Yes, we should have a dedicated innovation team

On the other hand, there may be some problems or opportunities that may need a dedicated team. Problems or opportunities that are not in the core domain of any of the teams and can be a distraction for them may require a new dedicated innovation team.

At Lopes we started to use a technique we borrowed from our friends at iFood called Jet Ski teams, to solve this type of problems that were not in the core domain of any of the teams. Jet Ski teams are small, dedicated teams temporarily assembled to tackle this kind of problems. We pick people with specific knowledge and experience to built the Jet Ski team, and leave them focused on solving the problem. Surely they’ll be missed in their original teams, and we need to account for that, i.e., certain objectives and key results of their original teams may not be hit, which needs to be taken into consideration when building Jet Ski teams. another aspect of consideration is, if the team is successful in creating and implementing a solution for the problem, who will take care of this solution when the Jet Ski team is disassembled and its members return to their original teams.

Another way to create a new dedicated innovation team is to create a business unit (B.U.) with a general manager and a few people in order to tackle an specific problem or opportunity. We used this approach at Gympass when we created in the 2nd half of 2019 3 new business units. One focused on selling Gympass to SMBs, another to create a marketplace of product and services for gyms and studios, and a third one, which I lead as the general manager, to explore the opportunity of creating a wellbeing apps marketplace that ended up becoming Gympass Wellness. This is normally a more permanent approach, so when deciding to create a new business unit it is always important to define how the people relocating to the new business unit will be replaced in their current positions.

Summing up

  • Should we have a dedicated innovation team? is a question that I get frequently in my coaching sessions. The short answer is “no and yes”.
  • No because the entire team should have space to innovate. The team must be given objectives and problems to solve, and use their knowledge to create possible solutions to these problems in order to achieve the results. These solution can be very innovative if given the space to experiment.
  • Yes because there are circumstances where problems or opportunities that we want to tackle are not in the core domain of any of the teams and can be a distraction for them. That’s when we may need a new dedicated innovation team. I’ve used 2 techniques to create new dedicated innovation teams. One is a technique create by iFood teams called the Jet Ski teams, small, dedicated teams temporarily assembled to tackle this kind of problems. The other is the creation of business units, small permanent teams that will work focused on the problem or opportunity.

Announcing: new public training on vision and strategy

That’s why I’m launching my very first public training, to help product leaders create vision and strategy for their products. Actually, in this training we will do it together. There are very limited spots, so get yours now!

Digital product education, coaching and advisory

I’ve been helping companies bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.

Devemos ter uma equipe de inovação dedicada?

Essa é uma pergunta que tenho recebido muito nas minhas sessões de coaching, então imagino que sua resposta pode interessar a mais pessoas. A resposta curta é “não e sim” que, eu sei, não responde muito. É a famosa e não tão útil resposta “depende” usada para responder a muitas perguntas de gerenciamento de produtos. Então vou expandir a resposta “não e sim” trazendo alguns exemplos da minha experiência.

Não, não devemos ter uma equipe de inovação dedicada

Às vezes, somos tentados a criar uma equipe de inovação dedicada porque todas as nossas equipes existentes já têm os tópicos do dia-a-dia para cuidar. Eles não têm espaço em sua agenda para inovar, então vamos criar uma equipe separada para se concentrar em explorar inovações.

Bem, essa não é a mentalidade certa para se ter. Todas as nossas equipes existentes não devem simplesmente ter algum espaço para inovar, mas seu trabalho diário deve ser explorar inovações.

Como? As equipes de desenvolvimento de produto devem ser equipes de solução de problemas ou, como diz Marty Cagan, equipes de produto empoderadas, ou seja, recebem problemas para resolver e resultados para alcançar e o fazem criando soluções para esses problemas. Com um problema a ser resolvido e um resultado a ser alcançado em mãos, a equipe fica livre para experimentar diferentes opções de solução, e é exatamente assim que nascem as inovações.

Se forçarmos nossas equipes de desenvolvimento de produtos a operar no modo implementador de soluções ou, como Marty Cagan as chama, como equipes de funcionalidades, não haverá espaço para inovações. Eles estarão trabalhando na implementação de soluções criadas por outras pessoas, pessoas que não têm experiência e conhecimento suficientes do que é possível fazer com a tecnologia. Portanto, é muito difícil criar inovações com equipes operando no modo implementador de soluções.

Então, para estimular todas as suas equipes de desenvolvimento de produtos a inovar, elas precisam ter um objetivo, um problema para resolver, para que possam testar soluções diferentes e talvez chegar a soluções novas e inéditas.

Na Lopes, a maior imobiliária do Brasil, onde liderei o Lopes Labs, a equipe de tecnologia e inovação entre 2020 e 2022, usávamos OKRs para definir os objetivos e principais resultados que queríamos alcançar e acompanhamos esses objetivos e principais resultados semanalmente. Com isso as equipes ficavam livres para definir o que implementar para alcançar os principais resultados.

Tínhamos também hackdays trimestrais, 3 dias no início do trimestre quando o pessoal do Lopes Labs formava novas equipes temporárias para resolver os problemas propostos pelas próprias equipes. Muitas inovações interessantes nasceram durante os hackdays. Essa é uma técnica que também usei na Locaweb e no Gympass com resultados muito bons em termos de criação de inovações.

Sim, devemos ter uma equipe de inovação dedicada

Por outro lado, pode haver alguns problemas ou oportunidades que podem precisar de uma equipe dedicada. Problemas ou oportunidades que não estão no domínio central de nenhuma das equipes e podem ser uma distração para elas podem exigir uma nova equipe de inovação dedicada.

Na Lopes começamos a usar uma técnica emprestada de nossos amigos do iFood chamada equipes Jet Ski, para resolver esse tipo de problema que não era do domínio central de nenhuma das equipes. As equipes de jet ski são equipes pequenas e dedicadas, reunidas temporariamente para resolver esse tipo de problema. Escolhemos pessoas com conhecimento e experiência específicos para construir a equipe de Jet Ski e as deixamos focadas na solução do problema em questão. Com certeza eles farão falta em suas equipes originais, e precisamos levar isso em conta, ou seja, determinados objetivos e resultados chave de suas equipes originais podem não ser atingidos, o que precisa ser levado em consideração na construção de equipes de Jet Ski. outro aspecto a ser considerado é, se a equipe for bem sucedida na criação e implementação de uma solução para o problema, quem cuidará dessa solução quando a equipe de Jet Ski for desmontada e seus membros retornarem às suas equipes originais.

Outra maneira de criar uma nova equipe de inovação dedicada é criar uma unidade de negócios com uma gerente geral e algumas pessoas para lidar com um problema ou oportunidade específica. Utilizámos esta abordagem no Gympass quando criámos no 2º semestre de 2019 três novas unidades de negócio. Uma focado em vender Gympass para PMEs, outra para criar um marketplace de produtos e serviços para academias e estúdios, e uma terceira, que liderei como gerente geral, para explorar a oportunidade de criar um marketplace de apps de bem-estar que acabou se tornando o Gympass Wellness. Esta é normalmente uma abordagem mais permanente .Por esse motivo, ao decidir criar uma nova unidade de negócio é sempre importante definir como as pessoas que se deslocam para a nova unidade de negócio serão substituídas nas suas posições atuais.

Resumindo

  • Devemos ter uma equipe de inovação dedicada? é uma pergunta que recebo com frequência nas minhas sessões de coaching. A resposta curta é “não e sim”.
  • Não porque toda a equipe deve ter espaço para inovar. A equipe deve ter objetivos e problemas para resolver, e usar seu conhecimento para criar possíveis soluções para esses problemas a fim de alcançar os resultados. Estas soluções podem ser muito inovadoras se os times tiverem espaço para experimentar.
  • Sim, porque há circunstâncias em que problemas ou oportunidades que queremos abordar não estão no domínio central de nenhuma das equipes e podem ser uma distração para elas. É aí que podemos precisar de uma nova equipe de inovação dedicada. Já utilizei 2 técnicas para criar novas equipes de inovação dedicadas. Uma delas é uma técnica criada pelas equipes do iFood chamada de equipes Jet Ski. São equipes pequenas e dedicadas reunidas temporariamente para enfrentar esse tipo de problema. A outra é a criação de unidades de negócios, pequenas equipes permanentes que trabalharão focadas no problema ou na oportunidade.

Novidade: treinamento público sobre visão e estratégia

É por isso que estou lançando meu primeiro treinamento aberto ao público, para ajudar os líderes de produto a criarem a visão e estratégia de seus produtos. Na verdade, neste treinamento vamos fazer isso juntos. As vagas são muito limitadas, então garanta já a sua!

Educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão de produtos digitais

Tenho ajudado empresas a conectar negócios e tecnologia por meio de educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão e desenvolvimento de produtos digitais. Ajudo líderes de produto (CPOs, heads de produtos, CTOs, CEOs, tech founders, heads de transformação digital) a extrair mais valor e resultados de seus produtos digitais. Veja aqui como posso ajudar você e a sua empresa.

Newsletter

Escrevo reguIarmente sobre gestão de produtos, desenvolvimento de produtos, liderança de produtos digitais e transformação digital. Vc pode receber uma notificação por email sempre que eu publicar algo novo, sem depender dos algoritmos de notificação de redes sociais. Basta assinar minha newsletter.

Gestão de produtos digitais

Você trabalha com produtos digitais? Quer saber mais sobre como gerenciar um produto digital para aumentar suas chances de sucesso, resolver os problemas do usuário e atingir os objetivos da empresa? Confira meu pacote de gerenciamento de produto digital com meus 3 livros, onde compartilho o que aprendi durante meus mais de 30 anos de experiência na criação e gerenciamento de produtos digitais. Se preferir, pode comprar os livros individualmente:

Only 7% of companies have digitally savvy leadership

That’s one of the findings of a study done by MIT Sloan researchers from CISR (Center for Information Systems Research) and published in the Spring 2021 edition of the MIT Sloan Management Review. The study was made with almost 17,000 executives of 1,984 large global companies. Among the companies they studied, the average top management team has nine members. Overall, only 17% of individual team members are digitally savvy.

They define being digitally savvy as having an understanding, developed through experience and education, of the impact that emerging technologies have on businesses’ success.

More interesting findings:

  • CIOs and CTOs are the most digitally savvy executives. But only around 45% are digitally savvy.
  • In terms of CEOs, COOs and heads of marketing, around 23% of them are digitally savvy.
  • Sales and CFO executives are 12% digitally savvy.
  • In terms of industries, at the top, with 30% digitally savvy executives, we have media, software, and telecom.
  • At the bottom (1% digitally savvy executives): construction; arts, entertainment, and recreation; and agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting.
  • Somewhere in the middle (12% digitally savvy): finance and insurance.

Why this matters?

According to the study, having a digitally savvy C-level impacts directly in the bottom line. For instance, A digitally savvy CEO together with a digitally savvy CFO who, rather than operating as a gatekeeper, can help identify which digital investments have potential to promote breakthrough performance are associated with a 6.7 pp increase in revenue growth.

In this study, the authors compared the performance of the top 25% digitally savvy management teams with the 25% bottom, and the differences are impressive:

top 25% digitally savvy management teamsbottom 25% digitally savvy management teams
% of revenues from new offerings in the past three years59%18%
% of revenues from cross-selling53%15%
Moving from command-and-control to a coach-and-communicate orientation83%28%
Holding people accountable85%41%
Encouraging innovation85%30%

Call to all product people and product leaders

I do believe it is our responsibility as product people and product leaders to help change this. Product people are digitally savvy, with a deep understanding, developed through experience and education, of the impact that emerging technologies have on businesses’ success.

During my period lead the digital transformation at Lopes, the biggest real estate company in Brazil, between 2020 and 2022, one thing that was clear to me is that we had to bridge the gap between business and technology so the company could take the most out of its investment in technology.

To help bridge this gap I created the concept of digital drops and business drops. Every month we had two important moments in the company:

  • Business Drops at Lopes Labs All-Hands: Lopes Labs is the name of the technology and innovation team I led at Lopes. During our All-Hands our team met for around 2 hours and we celebrated our results, shared learnings and welcomed new members. We always separated around 20 minutes so people from the business could talk about their areas and educate the Lopes Labs team. Below are examples of the topics we covered:
Lopes Labs Business Drops example
  • Digital Drops at Lopes Labs Update: every month we gathered the entire company for one hour to show Lopes Labs recent results and achievements. Between 5 to 10 minutes of this meeting was dedicated to share some topic on digital product development and management. Below are examples of the topics we covered:
Lopes Labs Digital Drops example

Announcing: new public training on vision and strategy

That’s why I’m launching my very first public training, to help product leaders create vision and strategy for their products. Actually, in this training we will do it together. There are very limited spots, so get yours now! With 30% discount!

Digital product education, coaching and advisory

I’ve been helping companies bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.

Apenas 7% das empresas tem times de liderança com experiência digital

Essa é uma das descobertas de um estudo feito por pesquisadoresdo CISR (Center for Information Systems Research) do MIT Sloan e publicado na edição da primavera de 2021 do MIT Sloan Management Review. O estudo foi feito com quase 17 mil executivos de 1.984 grandes empresas globais. Entre as empresas estudadas, o tamanho médio da equipe de liderança tem nove membros. No geral, apenas 17% dos membros individuais da equipe são experientes digitalmente.

Eles definem ser digitalmente experiente como ter uma compreensão, desenvolvida por meio da experiência e de educação, do impacto que as tecnologias emergentes têm no sucesso dos negócios.

Outras descobertas interessantes:

  • CIOs e CTOs são os executivos mais experientes digitalmente. Mas apenas cerca de 45% são digitalmente experientes.
  • Em termos de CEOs, COOs e heads de marketing, cerca de 23% deles são digitalmente experientes.
  • Executivos de vendas e CFOs têm 12% de conhecimento digital.
  • Em termos de indústrias, no topo, com 30% de executivos com experiência digital, temos mídia, software e telecomunicações.
  • Na base (1% de executivos com experiência digital): construção; artes, entretenimento e recreação; e agricultura, silvicultura, pesca e caça.
  • No meio (12% digitalmente experiente): finanças e seguros.

Por que isso importa?

De acordo com o estudo, ter um C-level digitalmente experiente impacta diretamente no resultado. Por exemplo, uma CEO com experiência digital junto com uma CFO com experiência digital que, em vez de atuar como um gatekeeper, pode ajudar a identificar quais investimentos digitais têm potencial para promover um desempenho inovador estão associados a um aumento de 6,7 pp no ​​crescimento da receita.

Neste estudo, os autores compararam o desempenho das 25% melhores equipes de liderança digitalmente experientes com os 25% inferiores, e as diferenças são impressionantes:

25% das equipes de liderança com maior experiência digital25% das equipes de liderança com menor experiência digital
% da receita de novos produtos lançados nos últimos três anos59%18%
% das receitas provenientas de cross-sell53%15%
Mudou da orientação de comando e controle para uma orientação de orientação e comunicação83%28%
Ter as pessoas se sentindo responsáveis pelos resultados gerados85%41%
Incentiva a inovação85%30%

Um chamado para todo o pessoal de produto e líderes de produto

Acredito que é nossa responsabilidade como pessoas de produto e líderes de produto ajudar a mudar isso. As pessoas de produto são digitalmente experiente, com uma compreensão profunda, desenvolvida por meio de experiência e educação, do impacto que as tecnologias emergentes têm no sucesso dos negócios.

No período em que liderei a transformação digital na Lopes, a maior imobiliária do Brasil, entre 2020 e 2022, uma coisa que ficou clara para mim é que precisávamos fazer a conexão entre negócios e tecnologia para que a empresa pudesse aproveitar ao máximo seu investimento em tecnologia.

Para ajudar a preencher essa lacuna, criei o conceito de digital drops e business drops. Todos os meses tínhamos dois momentos importantes na empresa:

  • Business Drops na Lopes Labs All-Hands: Lopes Labs é o nome da equipe de tecnologia e inovação que liderei na Lopes. Durante nosso All-Hands nossa equipe se reunia por cerca de 2 horas para comemorarmos nossos resultados, compartilharmos aprendizados e recebermos novos membros. Sempre separávamos cerca de 20 minutos para que as pessoas de negócio pudessem falar sobre suas áreas e conscientizar a equipe do Lopes Labs. Alguns exemplos dos tópicos que abordamos são Jornada do Corretor, O que é consórcio?, CrediPronto, LGPD e compliance, Mercado primário, Mercado secundário, franquias e Rede Lopes, O que é ser um companhia de capital aberto (RI), Organograma da Lopes, Comissões, Institucional, história e unidades de negócio, Update sobre o mercado imobiliário.
  • Digital Drops no Lopes Labs Update: todo mês reuníamos toda a empresa por uma hora para mostrar os resultados e conquistas recentes do Lopes Labs. Entre 5 a 10 minutos desta reunião eram dedicados ao compartilhamento de algum tema sobre desenvolvimento e gestão de produtos digitais. Abaixo estão alguns exemplos dos tópicos que abordamos:
Exemplo dos Digital Drops do Lopes Labs

Novidade: novo treinamento público sobre visão e estratégia

É por isso que estou lançando meu primeiro treinamento aberto ao público, para ajudar os líderes de produto a criarem a visão e estratégia de seus produtos. Na verdade, neste treinamento vamos fazer isso juntos. As vagas são muito limitadas, então garanta já a sua! Com 30% de desconto!

Educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão de produtos digitais

Tenho ajudado empresas a conectar negócios e tecnologia por meio de educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão e desenvolvimento de produtos digitais. Ajudo líderes de produto (CPOs, heads de produtos, CTOs, CEOs, tech founders, heads de transformação digital) a extrair mais valor e resultados de seus produtos digitais. Veja aqui como posso ajudar você e a sua empresa.

Newsletter

Escrevo reguIarmente sobre gestão de produtos, desenvolvimento de produtos, liderança de produtos digitais e transformação digital. Vc pode receber uma notificação por email sempre que eu publicar algo novo, sem depender dos algoritmos de notificação de redes sociais. Basta assinar minha newsletter.

Gestão de produtos digitais

Você trabalha com produtos digitais? Quer saber mais sobre como gerenciar um produto digital para aumentar suas chances de sucesso, resolver os problemas do usuário e atingir os objetivos da empresa? Confira meu pacote de gerenciamento de produto digital com meus 3 livros, onde compartilho o que aprendi durante meus mais de 30 anos de experiência na criação e gerenciamento de produtos digitais. Se preferir, pode comprar os livros individualmente:

Full-time product leadership coach

3 months ago I announced that I was ending my full-time executive role leading Lopes’s digital transformation efforts, and I was still figuring out my focus moving forward.

I’m very fortunate to have had an amazing journey, full of learning experiences. I started my career in 1992 leading my own startup, a BBS that became one of Brazil’s first internet access providers. After that, I had the honor and privilege of leading amazing product development teams at Locaweb, Conta Azul, Gympass, and, most recently, Lopes. From pure tech companies, where the product developed by the product development team was the main product sold by the company (my own startup, Locaweb, and Conta Azul) to companies where the main product was not technology (Gympass and Lopes). 30+ years of operational experience in digital product development and management.

I’ve been sharing this experience and learnings in books, talks, coaching, and advisory sessions for more than 12 years as a side hustle. Due to the pandemic and the increasing virtual meeting culture, I was able to help more people and companies with my side hustle and I realized I really enjoyed doing this. For this reason, I decided to turn my side hustle into my full-time occupation:

I’m now a full-time coach and advisor on digital product development and management.

I decided to help more people and companies to bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management.

I do this through in-company talks and training, coaching and advisory sessions for product leaders as well as being part of advisory boards, as described in detail on my Advisory Services page.

New public training

To celebrate this decision, I’m launching my very first public training, to help product leaders create vision and strategy for their products.

Without the clarity of a product vision and strategy, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to manage a product. How do you decide where to put your focus and energy? What to leave for later? How to show stakeholders what you intend to do with the product? How to have arguments to say no to requests for new features in your product?

In this training you will have everything you need to create your digital product vision and strategy:

  • Concepts and tools: In the first two days you will learn about several important topics to help you create your product vision and strategy. Maybe you know some of these concepts, but it’s always good to review before getting your hands dirty! I will also share the tools I use to create product vision and strategy.
  • Hands-on: You will have a week to prepare the first version of your product vision and strategy. After this one week, we will have two days for you to present your product vision and strategy for participant comments and insights.
  • One-on-one mentoring: You can then schedule a one-on-one mentoring time with me to talk about your product vision and strategy, as well as any other digital product management and development topics.

Attention: the class is limited to a small group people in order to encourage everyone’s participation, especially in the practical part of presenting the visions and strategies of each participant’s products.

The class will be in Portuguese. If you don’t speak Portuguese, please let me know and, if there’s interest, I’ll schedule a session in English.

Digital product education, coaching and advisory

I’ve been helping companies bridge the gap between business and technology through education, coaching, and advisory services on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.

Coach de líderes de produto full-time

Há 3 meses, anunciei que estava encerrando meu ciclo como executivo full-time liderando o #LopesLabs, o time de tecnologia e inovação da Lopes Consultoria de Imóveis, e que eu ainda estava descobrindo meu foco no futuro.

Nesses mais de 30 anos de carreira, sou muito grato por ter tido uma jornada incrível, cheia de muito aprendizado. Comecei minha carreira em 1992 liderando minha própria startup, uma BBS que se tornou uma das primeiras provedoras de acesso à internet do Brasil. Depois disso, tive a honra e o privilégio de liderar equipes incríveis de desenvolvimento de produtos na Locaweb, Conta Azul, Gympass e, mais recentemente, na Lopes. Desde empresas de tecnologia, onde o produto desenvolvido pela equipe de desenvolvimento de produtos era o principal produto vendido pela empresa (minha própria startup, Locaweb e Conta Azul) até empresas onde o principal produto não era tecnologia (Gympass e Lopes). Foram mais de 30 anos de experiência operacional em desenvolvimento e gestão de produtos digitais.

Tenho compartilhado essa experiência e aprendizado em livros, palestras, coaching e sessões de consultoria há mais de 12 anos como uma atividade paralela. Devido a pandemia e a crescente cultura de reuniões virtuais, pude ajudar mais pessoas e empresas com essas minhas atividades paralelas e percebi que gosto muito de fazer isso. Por esse motivo, decidi transformar minha agitação lateral em minha ocupação em tempo integral:

Agora sou coach e advisor de produto em tempo integral.

Decidi ajudar mais pessoas e empresas a conectarem negócios e tecnologia por meio de educação, coaching e advisory em desenvolvimento e gerenciamento de produtos digitais.

Faço isso por meio de palestras e treinamentos in-company, sessões de coaching e advisory para líderes de produtos, além de fazer parte de conselhos consultivos, conforme descrito em detalhes na minha página sobre Serviços de Consultoria.

Novo treinamento aberto ao público

Para comemorar essa decisão, estou lançando meu primeiro treinamento aberto ao público, para ajudar as pessoas líderes de produto a criar visão e estratégia para seus produtos.

Sem a clareza da visão e da estratégia de seu produto é muito difícil, ou mesmo impossível, gerenciar seu produto. Como decidir onde colocar seu foco e energia? O que deixar para depois? Como mostrar para os stakeholders o que você pretende fazer com o produto? Como ter argumentos para dizer não para pedidos de novas funcionalidades em seu produto?

Aqui você terá tudo o que você precisa criar a visão e estratégia de seu produto digital:

  • Conceitos e ferramentas: Nos dois primeiros dias você conhecerá sobre vários temas importantes para te ajudar a criar a visão e estratégia de seu produto. Talvez você conheça alguns desses conceitos, mas é sempre bom revisar antes de colocar a mão na massa! Também compartilharei as ferramentas que uso para criar visão e estratégia de produto.
  • Mão na massa: Você terá uma semana para preparar a primeira versão da visão e estratégia de seu produto. Após essa uma semana, teremos dois dias, para você apresentar a visão e estratégia de seu produto para comentários e insights dos participantes.
  • Mentoria individual: Em seguida, você poderá agendar uma hora de mentoria individual comigo para falarmos sobre a visão e estratégia de seu produto, bem como para tratar quaisquer outros temas de gestão e desenvolvimento de produtos digitais.

Atenção: a turma é limitada a poucas pessoas com o objetivo de fomentar a participação de todos, principalmente na parte prática de apresentação das visões e estratégias dos produtos de cada participante.

Educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão de produtos digitais

Tenho ajudado empresas a conectar negócios e tecnologia por meio de educação, treinamento e aconselhamento em gestão e desenvolvimento de produtos digitais. Ajudo líderes de produto (CPOs, heads de produtos, CTOs, CEOs, tech founders, heads de transformação digital) a extrair mais valor e resultados de seus produtos digitais. Veja aqui como posso ajudar você e a sua empresa.

Newsletter

Escrevo reguIarmente sobre gestão de produtos, desenvolvimento de produtos, liderança de produtos digitais e transformação digital. Vc pode receber uma notificação por email sempre que eu publicar algo novo, sem depender dos algoritmos de notificação de redes sociais. Basta assinar minha newsletter.

Gestão de produtos digitais

Você trabalha com produtos digitais? Quer saber mais sobre como gerenciar um produto digital para aumentar suas chances de sucesso, resolver os problemas do usuário e atingir os objetivos da empresa? Confira meu pacote de gerenciamento de produto digital com meus 3 livros, onde compartilho o que aprendi durante meus mais de 30 anos de experiência na criação e gerenciamento de produtos digitais. Se preferir, pode comprar os livros individualmente:

How to measure a company’s digital maturity?

In my last article, I discussed the digital maturity of a company, which means how much the company has been investing in digital products to potentialize its results and how much the results have been actually potentialized by digital efforts.

Even though it is a clear definition, we can go a bit deeper to understand and even quantify the digital maturity of a company.

Digital maturity and product culture

Product culture means the set of values and behaviors that enables the digital product to generate the best results for the company while solving customer problems.

There are 4 main values/behaviours that are mandatory to any company that builds successful digital products:

1. Release early and often

The sooner we present the product to our users, the better, as we can receive feedback from real users who will be able to use the product in their own context. In this article, I explain the 4 reasons why it is so important to release early and often: (i) this is the moment of truth, (ii) so you avoid the excess of features, (iii) to accelerate the return of the investment and (iv) to avoid the perils of the cone of uncertainty.

To measure if the product development team is releasing early and often, we need to measure the number and frequency of deploys. A company called DORA (DevOps Research and Assessment), acquired by Google in 2018, have been researching the DevOps and SRE practices used by companies since 2015 and was able to categorize companies’ software delivery and operational performance based on 4 factors:

  • Deploy frequency: how often does your organization deploy code to production or release it to end users?
  • Lead time: what is your lead time for changes (that is, how long does it take to go from code committed to code successfully running in production)?
  • Time to restore: how long does it generally take to restore service when a service incident or a defect that impacts users occurs (for example, unplanned outage, service impairment)?
  • Change fail percentage: what percentage of changes to production or releases to users result in degraded service (for example, lead to service impairment or service outage) and subsequently require remediation (for example, require a hotfix, rollback, fix forward, patch)?

Based on the answers, it is possible to have a software delivery performance metric, as detailed below:

Software delivery performance metric

DORA was able to gather during the seven years of research more than 32,000 survey responses from industry professionals and noticed an interesting evolution:

Evolution of the software delivery performance metric over the years

You can answer these questions directly on their site to check how your team is doing.

The more a product development team gets closer to the elite level described above, the more the company is digitally mature in this value/behaviour.

2. Focus on the problem

As explained in this article, a very important step in creating a good solution is understanding the problem. When we hear about a problem, we immediately start thinking about solutions. However, the more time we spend learning about the problem, the easier it will be to find a solution, and chances are good that this solution will be simpler and faster to implement than the first solution we thought of.

Solution implementation teams are teams working on implementing a solution designed by someone else. Problem-solving teams are teams that work to deeply understand the causes of the problem, the context, and the motivation that people have to solve it. In doing so, they are able to implement the best solution for the problem at hand.

I’ve been working for quite some time in companies undergoing a digital transformation or which have people, including C-level, not familiar with digital product development methods. One of the biggest challenges in companies undergoing digital transformation is moving from a “business demands => technology implements” mindset into a “business brings problems/needs => technology works on understanding these problems/needs with the user, testing solution hypothesis, and implementing a validated solution hypothesis” mindset.

How can we measure how much a product development team is focused on problems? My suggestion is to look into the past 10 to 20 things that the team implemented and check how the need for each of the things implemented arrived for the product development team. Did it arrive as a feature request, i.e., a solution implementation request? Or did it arrive as a problem to be solved? The more things arrived to the product development team as problems to be solved, the more the company is digitally mature in this value/behaviour.

3. Result delivery

Besides being able to deliver early and often and be focused on problems, the product development team has to deliver results. Business results as well as results for the client and user of the product. I discussed this value in this article, where I made it clear that delivering features is not a result. All features are a means that serves an end, the achievement of a business objective. It is very important that we have clear business objectives. Ideally, business objectives should be connected to the bottom line, i.e., increasing revenue and/or decreasing costs.

How can we measure how much a product development team is delivering results? My recommendation is to take a look at this product development team’s OKRs. The objectives and key results must be connected to the company’s results and the customers’ results. If we find OKRs that are tasks or OKRs that are metrics, but metrics that are not connected to the company and customers’ results, it is clear that the product development team is not focused on delivering results. Normally, a product development team has more than one objective and more than 3 key results. We can analyze all objectives and key results to check their connection with company and customer results as a yes or no. The more yes we find, i.e., the more objectives and key results we find connected to company and customer results, the more the company is digitally mature in this value/behaviour.

4. Ecosystem mindset

This value/behaviour means making decisions that create value for all actors of the ecosystem where the business operates. These decisions cannot harm any of the participants of the ecosystem. In this article I explained it at length with an example from Gympass. If the company is a platform or a marketplace, this value/behaviour is quite easy to understand, but it also applies if the business does not operate as a platform or marketplace. If you are a business with one type of customer, the ecosystem is formed by the customer and the business, and this value/behaviour means that you cannot make decisions that benefit the business but harm the customer or vice-versa. You can make decisions that benefit that business and doesn’t affect the customer, but you cannot harm the customer. And vice-versa, you cannot harm the business in benefit of the customer. This value/behaviour builds on top of the customer-centric concept but expand it to include all different customers and the business in this mindset.

How can we measure if the company has an ecosystem mindset? My suggestion in this case is to analyze the last 10 to 20 decisions made and check to whom they brought value and if any of them generated a negative impact in any of the participants of the ecosystem.

How to measure a company’s digital maturity?

Usijng the above values and behaviours, we can assess how digitally mature is a company and, more importantly, define what should be our focus areas to improve it digital maturity. Answer the 4 questions below to self-assess your digital maturity.

Release early and often: after taking the DORA’s DevOps quick check on the 4 factors (deploy frequency, lead time, time to restore and change fail percentage), how do you rank?

(a) Elite

(b) High

(c) Medium

(d) Low

Focus on the problem: how much of the product development team deliveries originated from solution implementation requests?

(a) 0%

(b) Less than 5%

(c) Between 5% and 50%

(d) More than 50%

Result delivery: How much of the product development team’s OKRs are connected to company’s objectives?

(a) All of them!

(b) More than 90%

(c) Between 50% and 90%

(d) Less than 50%

Ecosystem mindset: How much of the latest decisions impacted negatively one of the actors of the ecosystem?

(a) 0%

(b) Less than 5%

(c) Between 5% and 50%

(d) More than 50%

Now, for each (a) add 4 points, for each (b) add 3 points, for each (c) add 2 points and for each (d) add 1 point. The total indicates your digital maturity:

Digital maturity
13 or more pointsHigh: Congratulations. You have high digital maturity. This means that your company has been investing in digital products to potentialize its results and your company’s results have been greatly potentialized by digital efforts. Your focus now should be on constantly evolving you digital capabilities.
Between 12 and 6 pointsMedium: You are on the right path. Your company is starting to invest in digital products to potentialize its results and you are starting to see your company’s results being actually potentialized by digital efforts. Hopefully, by answering the above questions, you now have a good understanding on where to focus to increase your digital maturity and, consequently, improve your results from your digital products.
5 or fewer pointsLow: You are starting your digital journey. Your company is investing a bit in digital products to potentialize its results and you have not yet seen much of your company’s results being actually potentialized by digital efforts. The recommendation for you is that you should continue investing in building your digital product culture so you can get more and more results from your investment.

So there you have it, a simple way to assess your digital maturity.

Real life examples

I joined Gympass in mid-2018 and when I joined, it was clear there was room for improvement on our digital maturity. The same happened when I joined Lopes in mid-2020. In both cases we focused on improving the behaviours that could bring us to an incresced digital maturity.

Disclaimers and final remarks:

  • The examples above are from what I recall from the time I worked in these companies. Ideally, this type of assessment should be done considering current behaviours with answers from the leaders of the company and the product development team. This assessment should be made periodically, every 6 months or every year.
  • It is possible to have companies with the same digital maturity score, but with different behaviours to focus in terms of what to do to improve the digital maturity, as are the cases of Gympass and Lopes in the examples above.
  • More important than to know the digital maturity stage a company is or the score it has, is to know what are the main areas that the company and the product development team should focus to improve its digital maturity.
  • Knowing and improving digital maturity is just a tool, not an objective. It is a tool to help a company extract more its digital efforts. It’s a tool to help a company achieve its objectives and resultts.

Summing up

  • Digital maturity of a company means how much the company has been investing in digital products to potentialize its results and how much the results have been actually potentialized by digital efforts.
  • To measure digital maturity, we need to assess how the company is in each of the 4 values and behaviours of its digital product culture. Release early and often. Focus on the problem. Result delivery. Ecosystem mindset.
  • Knowing and improving digital maturity is just a tool, not an objective. It is a tool to help a company extract more from its digital efforts. It’s a tool to help a company achieve its objectives and resultts.

Digital product education, coaching and advisoring

I’ve been bridging the gap between business and technology through education, coaching and advisoring on digital product development and management. Check here how I can help you and your company.

Newsletter

I write regularly about product management, product development, digital product leadership, and digital transformation. You can receive a notification whenever I publish a new article, without depending on any social network algorithms to notify you! Just subscribe to my newsletter.

Digital Product Management Books

Do you work with digital products? Do you want to know more about how to manage a digital product to increase its chances of success, solve its user’s problems and achieve the company objectives? Check out my Digital Product Management bundle with my 3 books where I share what I learned during my 30+ years of experience in creating and managing digital products:

You can also acquire the books individually, by clicking on their titles above.